starks_150x200.jpg 

I just browsed by this minor topic.  Some of the comments people posted were pretty funny though, so I suggest you take a look HERE.

My personal thought….The guy is a bum.  He deserves nothing!

Marion Is Kind Of An Idiot

September 28, 2007

marioshawn300.jpg

Shawn Marion really is kind of an idiot.  In case you’ve been on vacation this past week, Shawn Marion has publicly announced that he wants out of Phoenix.  Yes, this is the same place and team that holds Steve Nash and Amare Stoudemire.  Why you might ask?  Pretty much because Marion’s not getting any love.  It sounds to me like he used to be an attention kid growing up.  Why would he ever ask to be off a team that is soooo close to a championship?  After signing Grant Hill, the Suns seem like a front runner, more so than ever to win the west.  In a weird way, I understand where Marion is coming from.  He doesn’t receive very much credit for his production.  His numbers speak volumes, yet the first two names when mentioning Phoenix is Steve and Amare.  He’s nearly the Alfred to the Batman and Robin tandem (okay, not that extreme).  But at the end of the day, Marion will likely be traded to a team that isn’t in half as good as a position as the Suns are.  It’s just not worth it to move.  If his ultimate goal is to win a championship, he would stay with Phoenix.  If he does get traded, I would expect his numbers to actually decrease.  Marion is a guy that is not a first option in an offense.  Rather, he gets his points and rebounds off of loose balls.  He picks up the garbage.  Without Steve Nash driving the lane, he won’t be as open.  As well, Amare pulls defenses onto him, often creating open looks for Marion cutting into the lane.  With any other team, these type of points and boards won’t be gained.  I think he needs to take a step back and look at the big picture.  He’s still young (ish), making a boat load of money, and might possibly win a championship this year.  Why Leave?!?!  What An Idiot.

Bill Walton Sucks!

September 26, 2007

bill_walton.jpg

Alright, a little harsh.  But he does!  Forbes based their definition of a pundit as “a person who makes comments or judgments, especially in an authoritative manner; critic or commentator.”  Firstly, classifying Bill Walton as a pundit if fair and accurate.  That’s about all the kudos I can give to Forbes magazine.  On the other side of things, he sucks!  Everytime you watch a game and first hear Walton’s voice, you think to youself “damn, this is going to be a long and annoying game.”  For the love of the game, you stick it out, and somewhat enjoy watching LeBron drop 40.  Could you imagine watching that game, minus Bill Walton’s voice?  LeBron would have probably scored 50.  Walton’s opinions on the game and various players are terrible.  His perspective is outdated and always draws comparisons to his playing days, which quite clearly, no one gives a damn about anymore.  His comments are annoying, his critiques are off, and his commentating sucks.  Therefore, I vote to put Bill Walton in the Bottom 10 Pundits!

All you read about these days is how Kobe Bryant won’t show up to training camp because the Lakers didn’t make any significant off season moves.  As well, you’ll hear that Andre Kirilenko wants out of Utah and wants to play elsewhere, even overseas.  Do you really think these guys’ teams will let them get away with the lazy approach?  I don’t think so!  Firstly, Kobe is a ball player before he’s a business man.  He’s not the type to hold out.  He’s a guy that loves the game, and would rather ball than sit on the sideline.  Ultimately, this guy is a leader.  What kind of a leader doesn’t show up on day one, or holds out in the middle of the season (see A.I. missing practice-its just practice).  This isn’t Kobe’s style, so I wouldn’t be in any rush to buy the hype.  Onto AK47.  This guy is under contract with the Jazz.  He’s clearly getting overpaid, and doesn’t even fit into Jerry Sloan’s system.  If I were him though, I’d stick around.  The Jazz have something great going on, nearly making it to the finals last year.  Beyond that, he’s making wayyy more money than he’s even worth.  It would be in his best interest to stick around for the remainder of his contract, and then go travel the world, play ball, or whatever it is he wants to do afterwards.

On a side note, I apologize to the loyal readers as I’ve been taking long absences away from the blog.  Life gets busy sometimes, and you just have to roll with it.  My goal is to keep back on my game though, so keep checking back.

Finally…practice?  This never gets old!

sheed1.jpg

It seems like the Pistons are going to be moving Rasheed Wallace into the center spot, allowing Antonio McDyess to move into the starting lineup.  Although having Dice moving into the starting lineup sounds great on paper, this significant adjustment is quite harmful for the boys in red, white and blue.  To start out, Sheed isn’t a true center.  He’s fantastic power forward who can post up down low and drain the 3-ball.  Having Dice allows Sheed to get more room posting up, and will in fact force him to post up more often (as opposed to settling for shots from 3).  For those that don’t remember, Dice went through a serious injury and is even lucky to make such a brilliant recovery from it.  Having him come off the bench and play a respectable role was a perfect spot for him.  In this lineup, he’ll be forced to play more minutes than his body can probably handle, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see him go down in the middle of the season because of the demand the lineup change will put on him.  Now, Jason Maxiell and Amir Johnson will be the primary big men coming off the bench.  Although Maxiell is one of the better up-and-coming younger big men in the league, he’s not at the point to become the Dice-like 6th man.  As for Amir Johnson, the Pistons gave him a lot of money and have high hopes that he’ll perform like he did in the D-league.  He is a huge gamble.  To me, this kind of move is showing that of a team who’s in the middle of something in between a rebuilding year and contending year.  It’s a hybrid that doesn’t seem to make any sense.  The Pistons still have an amazing young core of guys in the starting roles, and should have made a move, or still should make a move for some more depth.  Having Dice coming off the bench was probably a plan B or C.  Joe D and the boys in the front office need to start working on Plan A and cook up some magic.

jjredick.jpg

Have you ever pondered this question?  After reading TrueHoop today, Kelly Dwyer pointed out a valid point.  Perimeter shooting is at a premium in the NBA right now.  If you try and derive the reason why, you’d have to look where all the players are coming from.  College of course (well, mostly).  In College, the 3-line is 20 feet and 9 inches, where in the NBA it is 23 feet and 9 inches.  This extra 3 feet is pretty drastic for young shooters to get adjusted to, coming out of College.  The prime example I think about is J.J. Redick.  In College, this guy couldn’t miss.  I would always stand up for him in the J.J. or Adam Morrison debate.  He seemed like the perfect candidate to come into the league and start firing down some threes, just like how Jason Kapono has done so well.  Well if you caught a glimpse of J.J. this past season, you’ll know this wasn’t the case.  He had to adjust his shot for the extra 3 feet.  This is no easy task!  Think about it.  He has been shooting the 3-ball from the same distance since high school, right up until he finished his career at Duke.  He then comes in the league and everyone thinks he’s a dud.  I still see a future for this guy as a sharp shooter.  Again, Jason Kapono wasn’t even worth talking about until this past season, and now he’s making the big bucks.  This leads me to my initial question:  What if the college and NBA 3-point line were the same distance?  For one, perimeter shooters in the NBA would NOT be at a premium.  The transition into the NBA for shooters would be quite easy.  As long as the distance is the same, they will knock down these shots.  Guys like J.J. Redick would have been more useful and affective in their first season.  I’m sure the same was said for guys like Steve Kerr.  I’m sure his numbers weren’t all that pretty as a rookie.  Would the NCAA ever enact this type of change?  Probably not, but hey, it’s worth a ponder.

And the best part is I’m a part of it!  Sebastian over at HalfcourtHeave put it all together (and contributed).  Also included were: 

  • goathair of The Blowtorch
  • Brian of Empty The Bench
  • It’s a great discussion and as I read through it I was a little thrown off by what some of the other guys were writing, but overall, I found myself nodding along.

    Check it out HERE!!!!