Sheridan a Poor Evaluator of Team USA

September 2, 2007

team_usa.jpg

Yesterday at ESPN, Chris Sheridan wrote about team USA’s success and went on to evaluate each player’s contribution in a grade format. Of course it’s easy to give Carmelo, Kobe and LeBron an A, A+ and A respectively. Those guys are on any school’s honour roll (although I would argue Kobe should just as likely have an A+ too). The grades that surprised me and I disagree with are specifically Tyson Chandler, Tayshaun Prince, and Michael Redd. Starting with Chandler, Sheridan gave him a B. This is unfair because the role he was set out to play, he played unbelievably! He wasn’t chosen to be the starting centre and put up those numbers. He was chosen to be a solid defensive specialist and be a rebounding machine. He accomplished all of this, and blocked 14 shots in total! In we’re evaluation his contribution based on what he was supposed to do, I give him an A! Next, Tayshaun Prince. Sheridan gave this guy a B. I was so happy when the team added this guy in the first place. The team chose him because every team needs role players like himself. They didn’t need him to come in and score points at all, but rather do everything else (ie: rebound, play defense,etc). Although his shooting percentage was down, he was one of the team’s leading rebouders! I remember catching that he had something around 12 rebounds one game! This guy should get more credit for job he did well that he was supposed to do. I’d give him an A-. Finally, we have Michael Redd. Sheridan gave him a B+. Unlike Chandler and Prince, Redd was brought in for instant scoring. The last time I checked, he average 15.4 point on a team where the scoring was so spread. This is impressive! Although that average would be mediocre in the NBA, this is significant for a bench guy in international play. His job was to score, and he was reliable in this position. He deserves and A!

Of course, anyone and everyone could argue a half grade here and there, but I was taken back by Sheridan’s harsh grading. I know he’s a teacher in school I would NOT want.

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3 Responses to “Sheridan a Poor Evaluator of Team USA”


  1. Interesting points. Chandler definitely outplayed expectations for his role–Sheridan acknowledges that, but notes that Chandler couldn’t make a free throw (and he’s not the most effective offensive player to begin with; Tyson didn’t have a single assist all tournament). I think a B is about right–the average of an A for defense, a C for offense.

    You’re right that Redd’s play was worthy of a higher grade, though. As predicted by so many, his outside shooting was such a difference from last year to this year.

    But I kind of like that Sheridan grades harsh. As far as I can remember, he’s been right on Team USA’s chances–he predicted that they’d lose last year and they’d come up short in the Olympics. Too often, these feature writers buddy up to the people they cover and end up being blinded; good for one of ESPN’s leading NBA writers to aim for objectivity.

  2. clutch3 Says:

    When it comes to Chandler, like Prince, he was needed to score. As the 3rd center, he was the specialist, and that’s why I give him an A, because he played that role very well.
    Redd should have an A,etc.
    Sheridan was harsh on this year’s team, and he does almost have to be. It’s easy to just give everyone an A, but when you’re going to mark various people harshly, you have to be careful. It killed me as a Chancey Billups fan to see such a low grade, but I agreed with it. But Prince, Chandler and Redd were all off.

  3. Cqcshlbq Says:

    9BzOlP comment6 ,


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